Sex Addicts Anonymous Primary Purpose

Recovery from sex addiction

"We, who have recovered..."

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Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is sex addiction and how can I tell if I have it?

    What is sex addiction and how can I tell if I have it?   There are many different definitions of addiction. The treatment and therapy industries probably have their own definition. The state/gover...

  • How is working the 12 Steps different than therapy?

    How is working the 12 Steps different than therapy?   As a fellowship Sex Addicts Anonymous cannot express any opinion on therapy, good or bad. It is considered to be an outside issue (reference Tr...

  • How does this approach define abstinence?

    The Three Circles Using the Big Book     “Simple, but not easy; a price had to be paid.” Pg 14 (first paragraph)   As chronic sex addicts of the hopeless variety, we have little or no idea how t...

  • What is the purpose of 12 Step meetings?

    What is the purpose of 12 Step meetings?       We have experienced much confusion on this subject. We see two distinct subjects that need to be clarified. These are the fellowship in S.A.A. and th...

  • What are the Twelve Traditions and why are they so important?

    What are the Traditions?    See Individual Traditions     In the disease of sex addiction, we found ourselves unable to stay away from behaviors; that we admitted were killing ourselves and ca...

  • Why the Big Book of A.A.?

    Why the Big Book of A.A.? Back in the early days of Twelve Step before the existence of the Big Book, Bill Wilson in conferring with Dr Bob Smith (the co-founders of the 12 Step movement) both notice...

  • What are the Twelve Steps?

    What Are the Twelve Steps? The Twelve Steps summarize a system of actions designed to bring us into a relationship with the God of the individual members understanding. After we have worked the Steps...

  • Is this a religion or a cult?

      Are Twelve Step fellowships a religion? Are they a cult?   A.A.'s long form of the Tenth Tradition:   No A.A. group or individual should ever, in such a way as to implicate A.A., express any op...

  • What is a sponsor?

    What is a sponsor?  A sponsor is a qualified member of a Twelve Step fellowship who has been spiritually awakened as the result of working the Twelve Steps and shows another how to live by these prin...

  • How do I start a Big Book study?

    We recommend that you don't. The healthiest meetings we have ever experienced started by their membership focusing on that which they had power. These meetings weren't started until those who wished...

What Are the Twelve Steps?

The Twelve Steps summarize a system of actions designed to bring us into a relationship with the God of the individual members understanding. After we have worked the Steps and that relationship with God has been initiated, we continue to grow in it by living the Twelve Steps for the rest of our lives. Continued spiritual growth is essential to our continued sobriety. The specific directions for working this program, we believe, are contained entirely in the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous. 

 

These are the Twelve Steps in their summary form.

 

 

 

1. We admitted we were powerless over [our addiction] – that our lives had become unmanageable.

 

 

 

2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

 

 

 

3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

 

 

 

4. Made a fearless and searching moral inventory of ourselves.

 

 

 

5. Admitted to God, ourselves and another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

 

 

 

6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

 

 

 

7. Humbly asked God to remove our shortcomings.

 

 

 

8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.

 

 

 

9. Made direct amends to such people, wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

 

 

 

10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong we promptly admitted it.

 

 

 

11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

 

 

 

12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we tried to carry this message to other sex addicts and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

 

 

 

These actions brought us to a way of living that was far beyond the mere promise of no longer being obsessed with our addiction. They bring us to a place of contentment, joy and peace, without which sobriety would be meaningless. It is described by the promises of Step Nine.

 

 

 

If we are painstaking about this phase of our development we are going to be amazed before we are half way through. We are going to know a new freedom and a new happiness. We will not regret the past nor wish to shut the door on it. We will comprehend the word serenity and we will know peace. No matter how far down the scale we have gone, we will see how our experience can benefit others. That feeling of uselessness and self-pity will disappear. We will lose interest in selfish things and gain interest in our fellows. Self-seeking will slip away. Our whole attitude and outlook upon life will change. Fear of people and of economic insecurity will leave us. We will intuitively know how to handle situations which used to baffle us. We will suddenly realize that God is doing for us what we could not do for ourselves. Alcoholics Anonymous Pp 83-84

 

 

 

Other promises throughout the program assure us that we can be happy and satisfied no matter what life sends our way. Our experience agrees with these promises provided we meet the caveat of working the program as the basis of our daily living.